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Posts tagged "books":

06 Jan 2019

Books of 2018

There is no other media more immersive to me than reading. When I read, I dive deep into another world, and seize to perceive the reality around me. It is my escape from the everyday stresses of living in the modern world. Reading is truly sacred to me. So here are my favorite pieces of writing of 2018:

Shadow Divers

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This is a book about deep wreck diving. I am not interested in wrecks, or diving. Nevertheless, no book gripped me as hard last year as Shadow Divers. At first, I was a bit thrown off by the writing style, and thought it dramatized things too much. But I just couldn't put this book down. There were times when I surfaced from reading with a distinct feeling of having been there, of having touched that menacing shipwreck at the bottom of the ocean.

By the end of it, I was entirely engrossed in the story and its characters and the history of the mystery wreck. And then, in the epilogue, I learned that what I had thought embellished at first was actually meticulously researched and not overdramatic at all.

And best of all, my favorite podcast, Omega Tau had an interview with the main protagonist of the book, which is just fascinating!

The Shortest History of Germany

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This book is a strange choice to put on my list of books, because I didn't like it too much. I found it offputting which parts of history the author emphasized, and which parts he skipped. Apparently, the two world wars did not bear mentioning. The book paints a strangely specific west-vs-east map of Germany, which is not without merit, but surely not the whole story. And worst of all, I really didn't care for the writing style at all.

But when I look back on 2018, this book has stuck with me. Never mind its shortcomings, it has given me a map of Germany's history that I can fit other pieces of knowledge into. And that makes it valuable to me.

And then there were (N-One)

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I love short stories. And this one is just brilliant. It is by Sarah Pinsker, about Sarah Pinsker, and all Sarah Pinskers from neighboring parallel universes. Every character in this book is a Sarah Pinsker. And all of them agree, Sarah is no murderer. Yet, one of them has been found murdered.

I won't spoil more of it, just head over to the Uncanny Magazine and read it for yourself!



Graphic Novels

For years now, I have struggled to find graphic novels that speak to me. I usually find the drawing style off-putting, and would have preferred a more fleshed out novel instead of a shallow graphic novel. But this year, I found two brilliant graphic novels that I loved dearly:

Maus

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The half-auto-biographical narrative of a survivor of one the Nazi concentration camps. The novel juxtaposes the author's struggle to interview his father about his past, and thereby shows both the cruelty of the father's experience, and the man that this experience created. Both of these perspectives add weight to the unspeakable nastiness of the Holocaust.

But beyond that, it is also a story of humanity, struggle, and the small moments of joy amidst all the terror. Truly a masterpiece of a book.

Nimona

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In sharp contrast to the previous book, Nimona is just plain fun! Nimona is a teenage girl, and a shark, and the sidekick of Balister Blackheart, the biggest name in Supervillainy. And if you haven't guessed it from this description, it is wacky, and funny, and uplifting, and just… fun!

You can read the first three chapters online, and then you'll want to read the rest, too. It's just too much fun!

Tags: books
20 Dec 2017

Books of 2017

In late 2016, I took a short ferry flight to a small island in the area, and rekindled my love for aviation. Shortly afterwards, I started training for a pilot's license, and reading about aviation. From a literary perspective, aviation exists in the perfect goldilocks time frame of being just old enough to be thoroughly romanticized, but young enough for first-hand reports and thorough documentation to be available. What is more, powered flight has provided human observers with an unprecedented view of our world and our struggles, and is often as philosophical as it is exhilarating.

Aviation Reading List

Out of a long list of fascinating books on aviation I have read over the last two years, my favorites are:

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  • Fate is the Hunter by Ernest K. Gann, a gripping memoir of the early days of aviation. It has been only a little more than a hundred years since humans first took to the skies in Kitty Hawk in 1905, yet today aviation feels as mundane as horse-drawn carriages must have felt to the Wright Brothers. Gann lived through these early days, and tells his tales from a time when aviation was still young, dangerous, and perhaps more interesting. If you want to read more like this, Flight of Passage by Rinker Buck, and The Spirit of St. Louis by Charles Lindbergh are easy recommendations as well.
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  • Carrying the Fire by Michael Collins, one of the few first-hand accounts of an Apollo astronaut's voyage to the Moon. Most astronauts have published books later on, but most had them ghost-written, and none are as visceral and engaging as Michael Collins' journey on Apollo 8. It is humbling that Apollo's achievements have not been surpassed, despite our much more advanced technology and science. Other accounts worth reading are The Last Man on the Moon by Gene Cernan on Apollo 17, and How Apollo Flew to the Moon by W. David Woods, for a more technical view.
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  • Skyfaring by Mark Vanhoenacker is a more modern, and more philosophical account of how aviation has changed our perception of the world. If you yearn to fly like I do, then this book is a balm for the soul. The almost spiritual feeling of cutting your bonds with the ground is what this book is about, despite being written in today's un-romantic days of routine commercial airliners. I love it dearly. A more grounded account of aviation's history is Turbulent Skies by T. A. Heppenheimer, and maybe Slide Rule by Nevil Chute for some history on airships.

Fiction Reading List

But as much as I love aviation, my first love is still Science Fiction. We live in strange times of unprecedented prosperity, and yet we are strangely unsatisfied, as if the future didn't turn out to be the utopia it was meant to be. Or is this just a reflection of ourselves, how we do not live up to the future we built?

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  • A Closed and Common Orbit by Becky Chambers describes a more distant future, when space travel is as mundane as airliners are today, and humanity is just one of several alien species. Yet, with all its technological marvels, we still yearn for meaning and love, regardless of what strange world we live in. A Closed and Common Orbit is the second book in the series, and the first book I read. I think I prefer it in this order.


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  • The Laundry Files Series by Charles Stross is closer to home. Did you ever notice how computer programming is eerily similar to the arcane incantations we use to describe magic in fiction? Where is the difference between invoking a function that effects a robot, and invoking a magic spell that affects a demon? According to Charles Stross, this difference is really only playing with semantics, and we should be very careful with our incantations, lest the ghost in the machine really does have our demise in mind. These books have made me laugh out loud so many times, like when a weaponized PowerPoint turned people into zombies, or when a structured cabling project turned out to create an inadvertent summoning grid for an elder horror.
Tags: books
06 Jan 2016

Books of 2015

Among Others, by Jo Walton

Among_Others_(Jo_Walton_novel).jpg I don't usually enjoy fantasy novels and their romantic escapism. I much prefer fascinating sci-fi thought experiments. But this book won all the most important awards, so I gave it a shot. What if random chance could be bent a little with creativity, the power of believing in something, and some mysticism? You end up with a world that is richer, more meaningful, and altogether more alive, if you just cared to observe and to appreciate it's beauty. Reading this book left me enchanted and more observant long after I put it down. What a wonderful book!

A Son of the Circus, by John Irving

ASonOfTheCircus.JPG This is one of those books that was on my to-read list for months. It starts out as quirky and likeable as you would expect from John Irving. This time, we follow the tale of a Canadian/Indian doctor throughout his life, and his summer vacation in India. But this would not be John Irving if there weren't plenty of colourful characters, astute observations of human strangeness, and a meticulously crafted story. There is no scene in this book that does not serve a purpose, and so many moving parts my mind just boggles at the construction of it all. Yet at the same time, I was regularly laughing out loud. I loved every minute of this!

The Windup Girl, by Paolo Bacigalupi

Wind_up.jpg The whole world changed in the near future, when gasoline is a rare luxury, sea levels have risen and swallowed all the coastal cities, and man-made scourges have devastated most crops. And now it's not just humans that populate our urbanized world, but so too are our inventions, artificial humans called "windups" for their stutter-stop movements. But at the core, both humans and windups struggle for the same security, prosperity as ever. Such an inventive world, so much vivid creativity, social commentary, in this human struggle to not destroy ourselves.

Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance, by Robert Pirsig

Zen_motorcycle.jpg This is about equal parts a motorcycle journey of a father and his son across the US, and a dive into another man's discoveries of philosophy. To be honest, I liked this book more for it's character descriptions and travelling adventures than it's philosophy. I am really conflicted about putting this book on this list at all, but I kept thinking about this long after I finished reading it, so I guess this had a bigger influence on me than I realized.

Nexus/Crux/Apex, Rad/Blue/Green Mars, The Martian, The Three-Body Problem

What happens when you take today's world, and add nanotech brain upgrades (Nexus/Crux/Apex), or strand a lone scientist on Mars (The Martian), or send a large number of people to found a new colony on Mars (Red/Blue/Green Mars), or suddenly make contact with Aliens (The Three-Body Problem)? This what-if is what Science Fiction does best: Take this little what-if, and spin a gripping yarn from that. These books inspired me, made me think, were incredibly thrilling, but they did not have a lasting impact. Still well worth a read if you like Science Fiction, though.

Tags: books
30 Dec 2014

Books of 2014

Ancillary Justice / Ancillary Sword, by Ann Leckie

Ann_Leckie_-_Ancillary_Justice.jpeg I have been reading a lot of science fiction in the last few years. These books are part one and two of the best space opera I have ever read. The story is written from the perspective of an AI, sometimes inhabiting a lot of bodies, sometimes only one. Interestingly, this makes for a very introspective viewpoint, where politics and actions are expressed as consequences of nuanced human behavior and astute observation, as opposed to arbitrary human decisions. This perspective is extremely compelling, and makes for an extremely human story in a world that is a clever amalgamation of ancient Roman society and post-modern egalitarianism. There is no book I look forward to more fiercely than the conclusion of this series.

Scott Pilgrim, by Bryan Lee O'Malley

ScottPilgrim.jpg Scott Pilgrim is a twenty-something in the nineties. Scott Pilgrim doesn't have a job, and likes to play video games. Scott Pilgrim is fighting epic Anime battles against his girlfriends' exes. Scott Pilgrim is everyone, living in the real world. Scott Pilgrim is awesome, especially the new color-versions. The last part of the series will be released next year, and I really can't wait! (There's also a movie that is supposedly very good, but I won't watch it until I read all the comic books).



Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis

DoomsdayBook(1stEd).jpg This is about time travel from near-future Britain to the fifteenth century. But then, an epidemic breaks loose: Britain is in quarantine and civil order starts breaking. At the same time in the fifteenth century, the plague hits. Disease, and the people trying to deal with it, is a human tragedy beyond belief. Connie Willis manages to write about these things with empathy, and astounding humane love and humor. This story moved me more deeply than I care to acknowledge.




Tags: books
03 May 2014

Snow Crash

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This is probably the one book that made me who I am. I bought this book in the English section of a Norwegian bookstore while on a bike trip there. I was just out of school and I had not decided yet what to do with my life. My English was just barely good enough to understand Snow Crash.

At its essence, Snow Crash introduced me to the idea of hacking. That is, hacking in the abstract sense of using knowledge about the inner workings of things to influence the world. At the time, I didn't know anything about software yet. Even though the main hero of the book is a master hacker and part of the book plays out in cyber space, it never really talks about the act of writing code. I would learn about that later.

Snow Crash was my red pill. Re-reading it today, after having been a professional software engineer for a few years, I can't overstate how influential this book has been in my life. It instilled in me the desire to understand the deep structures of things. And with that, the ability to influence and create the world around me. It set me on the path to becoming who I am today.

Snow Crash also served as my introduction to modern utopian cyberpunk. Even though I spent my youth playing video games and reading bad sci-fi, I still remember Snow Crash as my formal introduction to cyber space, virtual avatars, megacorporations, and light cycle races. And it told of the awesome power of reason.

If you haven't already, go read this book!

Tags: books
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